BIG UP FOR VICKI HEY

Luca Gallarelli – Managing Director, Vicki Hey – Deputy Managing Director, & Tseliso Rangaka – Executive Creative Director

Vicki Hey has been appointed deputy managing director of Ogilvy & Mather Cape Town.

37-year-old Hey has been responsible for our iconic relationship with Volkswagen SA for the past 3 years and has been on the board since June 2013.

O&M CT MD Luca Gallarelli says Hey is the perfect fit for her new job; “Vicki successfully manages the most complicated and demanding tasks while always remaining one of the most cheerful and admired people in the entire agency. She is helping us write a new chapter in our story and I’m delighted to stand alongside her in doing so”.

Executive Creative Director Tseliso Rangaka hails her all-round credentials; “Vicki’s an amazing brand custodian in that she understands the value of creative ambition in driving our clients’ business forward. She’s also a lot of fun to work with. I’m really proud of her.”

A marketing graduate from Cape Technikon (now CPUT), Hey was at Joe Public, Lowe Bull and King James before joining O&M CT. In addition to Volkswagen, she has worked on many prime clients during her career including Bell’s Whisky, Allan Gray, Parmalat and several SAB brands.

Campaigns overseen by Hey have received multiple accolades including a rare Gold in Effective Creativity at the recent 2016 Loeries for Volkswagen Uber up!

She says she’s thrilled by the new role; “managing agencies is becoming a more complex task almost by the day and that’s a challenge I’m really looking forward to tackling alongside Luca and Tseliso”.

 

#MannesInCannes: half-time catch up

I come up for air/ the jury is pissed/ there’s a favourite

We’re nearly halfway through this year’s Cannes Lions festival and it’s time to come up for air. A lot has happened since the last time, most of which I have sworn to never, ever talk about.

What I can tell you though is that the city and weather are trying to outdo each other in the fairness stakes and it’s beautiful to watch. I kind of expected this, having been here once before. What’s quite a surprise has been the sheer number of Stan Smith’s, spectacles and beards the festival has managed to attract this year. Close to fifteen thousand people sporting one or other combination of the three. So far very few have been able to look back at a packed Palais des Festivals auditorium and raise a lion above their heads.

The various jury panels are mostly to blame for this. You see, while the rest of us soak up equal measures of inspiration and Rose wine, they are working really hard in sterile looking rooms and sometimes have to debate ideas until the wee hours. That makes them pretty pissed off most of the time. So nothing but the very, very best according to these guys makes it past the shortlist stage.

To make matters worse, every jury and presiding chairman set the tone for their category and decides beforehand what type of work they will be looking to award. Being “tough on charity this year” for the Direct panel. Or “awarding work that really engages consumers over work that only breaks the Internet” for the PR jury really influenced their votes in these categories. Which I imagine sucks for some but is part of the high stakes game.

Looking at the pattern of work that has been awarded so far, I would say simplicity of idea plus immaculate execution is the active ingredient this year. Craft really does get rewarded here, more so than at any other award shows. Some of the Print and Publishing work looks like it has been worked on for months and months.

I really like the Getty Images and Forbes work, very simple, well executed.

Getty

Getty Images – Dalai

Changing poverty

Forbes – Poverty

South Africa dominated the Radio category yet again and storytelling was the real winner. It was great to see Ogilvy Johannesburg haul them in one after the other. A Cannes Grand Prix is quite something up close. Even little children where crying in its direction when we had it next to our dinner table afterwards.

[KFC Every Man Meals – Coloured Weights]

A favourite with everyone has been Swedish Tourist Association’s “The Swedish Number” which has been attracting a lot of awards including the Grand Prix for Direct.

I quite enjoyed the funny cleverness in Heineken New Zealand’s “Brewtroleum”.

Panasonic’s “Life is Electric” work also caught my eye.

Finally Microsoft’s “Survival Billboard” made me feel good to see an actual billboard win in the outdoor category for a change.

That’s all I have time for now. As we go into the last lap of this highly charged, fiercely competitive marathon, I wish everyone still in their lane the best of luck.

Making the world a better place – One test drive at a time

What if you took an ordinary test drive and turned it into something extraordinary? Well, Volkswagen South Africa did just that with the Amarok Social Test Drive concept.

The ground-breaking concept takes an existing activity – the daily Dealership test drive of an Amarok – and re-purposes it into a highly beneficial programme of community interventions around South Africa which, in the process, provides a perfect demonstration of the virtues of the vehicle.IMG_6179

See the video below.

This is a brilliant idea which connects two important worlds in a seamless way that makes sense.

Nicholas Wittenberg, Ogilvy South Africa’s ECD of the Digital Portfolio believes the power of the idea lies in its scalability; “there’s no reason why every Amarok Dealer around the globe can’t do this quickly and easily which means there is a huge upside for ‘delivering’ social goods”.

See more videos here:

 

 

 

Ogilvy & Mather Cape Town creds:

  • Chief Creative Officer: Chris Gotz, Pete Case
  • Executive Creative Director: Tseliso Rangaka
  • Executive Creative Director. Digital Portfolio: Nicholas Wittenberg
  • Creative Director: Jacques Massardo, Prabashan Gopalakrishnan Panther
  • Creative Group Head: Justin Enderstein, Dean Paradise
  • Art Director: Matthew Pullen, Emma Butlin, Justin Enderstein
  • Copywriter: Kate Desmarais, Dean Paradise, Jacques Massardo
  • Senior Designer: Nick Mills, Jedd McNeilage
  • User Experience Specialist: Britta Graewe
  • Project Manager: Robyn De Beer
  • Frontend Developer: Michael Hanslo, Fanus du Toit
  • Managing Partner: Vicki HeyGroup
  • Account Director: Stuart Randall, Robin Hook
  • Agency Producer: Anthea Beylis
  • Head of Strategy: Awie Erasmus
  • Strategy: Mike Wills
  • Creative Director: Daniel Nash
  • Account Director: Jess Webb
  • Account Manager: Nazneen Ahmed
  • Account Executive: Janine Fortuin
  • Production Company: Motion City Films

 

Checking in with the Ogilvy Grads

Kara Levy and Glenn Kisela have been learning the ins and outs of agency life through the Ogilvy Graduate Programme (OGP). Our last check in with them was in April. Find out what life has been like at the Big O.

KARA:

Kara

Q: The last time we checked in you were leaving Account Management and heading to OgilvyOne (OO). Name one high and one low from your time at OO.

High note: There were so many! On a light note, sharing a desk with Claire and having some bonding time (we made a ‘your side/my side line’) and took it very seriously. Another high was actually working on a Sunday with a colleague from another agency putting a strat together for a presentation that was due to be presented on the Tuesday morning – that moment when things start to come together and a strong story and argument is built succinctly is so rewarding.

Low note: This is tough – there weren’t many lows, but if I had to say something it was probably having a mild panic attack when I realized I hadn’t ordered enough Lego for one of the workshops we were running and I had to get it couriered to my house – yes, we use Lego for workshops.

Q: You’re in Ogilvy PR (OPR) now. How has travelling through all these departments opened your eyes to what agency life is like?

I guess it has shown me how every department is able to function as a mini-agency on its own, but how important it is for all the departments to work together because everyone has such niche knowledge and skills.

Q: What are your plans after OPR?

I am planning on making my way back up to the 6th floor, to do some time in ATL strategy. It will be interesting because I have worked my way from very specific digital strategy, to a bit more of a broader perspective in PR strategy and I will end off with time looking at things from a very top line perspective.

Q: If you had to create an agency survival kit for an OGP, what would you include?

  • A notebook: Chris Rawlinson told me something really interesting in one of my first months at the agency, he said that you always have your best ideas in your first/first few years of working, so I always write down new ideas when they come to me and hopefully I’ll be able to implement them at some point.
  • Earphones: These serve more than one purpose, they are the ultimate “do not disturb” signal and they save you from the questionable music that sometimes comes out of the buzz
  • Flash drive: As you are working on presentations and with different people all the time, a well organised flash stick is a must have
  • Comfy shoes: people underestimate the amount of stair running that gets done in this building, and being looked down upon for taking the lift two floors is a real thing
  • Coffee/identify a good coffee spot: this is the 9 o’clock turbo fuel injection – make sure it’s good
  • Minimal desk decoration: as you move around a lot (I am on my 6th desk), you must have desk decoration that is easily movable and not much of it.

Q: Who is your “ad-crush” and why?

The people at Ogilvy Brasil who made an advert called “immortal fans” for Sport Club Recife. That advert was a large contributor to me wanting to get into advertising. Check it out:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8GFcAlWhBM

GLENN:

Glenn 2

Q: You’ve been with Ogilvy PR (OPR) for about 6 months now. What have you been up to? 

PR has been a whirlwind ride. It’s hard to put into words really. I’ve been involved in everything from setting up a newsroom for the agency to creating campaigns for various brands. Creating social content to doing fashion photo-shoots. It has been an incredible experience working in a place where I never actually know what each day is going to bring.

Q: If you could create an OPR survival kit, which 5 items would you include?

  • A bottle of Jameson to help you get through the late nights
  • A book that taught you a sense of humour in case you lack it
  • A music playlist that only featured Drake because obviously
  • A 4 pack of Red Bull because sometimes the world of PR moves too fast
  • Lastly, a dictionary because typos in our world means death.

Q: Who is your “ad-crush” and why?

It’s not Brittney Kok because she’s the worst.

Q: During your 6 months, name one high and one low while being at OPR.

A high would be winning the Times Creative Challenge, definitely. A low would be a particularly frustrating client presentation.

Q: How much caffeine do you need to get through a typical day?

2 cups a day. Excluding my daily Red Bull.

 

Castle Lite breaks the ice

Castle Lite is known for having a continuously fresh approach to branding and their latest campaign was no different. ‘Ziyabanda‘ is the first track to be recorded at the sub-zero temperature of -2.5°C and comes courtesy of Castle Lite, the only beer lagered at – you guessed it – minus two point five. If you’re wondering how this is possible: the beats are made out of ice.

The video, featuring South African hip hop star Stilo Magolide, was directed by Lebogang Rasethaba who has been documenting the music scene for the last few years. This hard hitting track will definitely get you prematurely ready for summer.

Watch it here:

Credits:

  • Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Cape Town
  • Production Company: Arcade Content
  • Directed by: Lebogang Rasethaba
  • Shot by: Rory O’Grady
  • Edited by: Julian Redpath

Audi quattro – Dirt Road & Wet Road

We created a campaign that highlighted the new Audi models, which included quattro technology as a standard feature.

The great thing is, with quattro technology, you can safely drive on any terrain without worrying about the road being too wet or too tough.To communicate this, we captured aerial shots from 13 metres high, and transformed the Audi into a magnet with the terrain forming a magnetic field. So whatever the terrain, like a magnet, with quattro, the Audi will stick to the road.

Audi Quattro - Dirt Road Craft 74168-Audi Quattro Loerie Entry A3-50mm.indd 74168-Audi Quattro Loerie Entry A3-50mm.indd

VW Touareg: Rear view camera

Every year, thousands of children and pets are killed or seriously injured because a driver backing up didn’t see them. This campaign demonstrates the importance of installing a rear view camera.

Print_Cape Town_Volkswagen Rear View Camera_ DOG Print_Cape Town_Volkswagen Rear View Camera_ GIRL Print_Cape Town_Volkswagen Rear View Camera_BOY